VIVA WALLET MAKES USE OF DIGITAL UPTICK

In March, the pan-European neobank Viva Wallet was uniquely able to help countless businesses to fast track a digital overhaul that began playing out across the continent. With a group of engineers at its core, Viva Wallet provided a nimble response to the sudden demand for a contactless, frictionless payments system across Europe. This included the rapid deployment of both card acceptance hardware in the form of Android card terminals, as well as software, namely Viva Wallet’s point of sale app for Android. SOURCE: forbes.com: https://www.forbes.com/sites/businessreporter/2020/11/10/a-contactless-payments-system-thats-breaking-down-barriers-across-europe/?sh=28d89551545f

NENT TO MAKE A NETFLIX DENT

A Swedish TV streaming company is positioning itself as a European challenger to Netflix as it pushes out from its Scandinavian stronghold further into the continent and the US by offering a mix of Nordic drama and sport. Nordic Entertainment Group (Nent) said on Tuesday it would enter Poland and the US next year, as well as the three Baltic states and five other unnamed European countries by 2023, as it seeks to compete in a global streaming market dominated by US players such as Netflix, Disney, HBO and Amazon. SOURCE: Financial Times: https://www.ft.com/content/778110df-35b8-43b0-8928-c2a71aa8a5b9

NOMAD ACQUIRES SWISS FINDUS

Nomad Foods has agreed to acquire Findus Switzerland from Froneri, as well as intellectual property from an affiliate of Nestlé, in a deal worth approximately €110 million. Nomad Foods already owns and operates the Findus brand across several European markets, including Italy, France, Spain, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Denmark. SOURCE: foodbev.com

PORTUGAL’S SHOEMAKERS TAKE NEW STEP

With social gatherings severely curtailed due to the coronavirus pandemic, people have been buying far fewer shoes. That has hit Portugal’s footwear industry hard, because it specialises in high-end leather shoes – normally reserved for big occasions and formal work settings – and most are exported. Some companies have switched to making more comfortable footwear for use around the house or in the supermarket. A few have added masks and other safety equipment to their production lines. But the changes won’t make up for all of the losses. Between January and August this year, exports from Portugal – Europe’s third largest footwear producer after Italy and Spain – slumped around 17% from the same period in 2019. SOURCE: Reuters

FILE PHOTO: Portuguese show industry tries to keep in step with demand Reuters